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Great Blue Heron

"Best invention for birding since binoculars"
-- Kenn Kaufman, Kaufman Field Guide to Birds of North America


"A landmark in birding"
-- John Fitzpatrick, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology


"I have been using BirdsEye since December 16th, 2009. At first I thought it was something I might use if I traveled somewhere to see what was being seen in the area. Then I entered my life list into the app. Soon, every time I opened it I noticed that there were birds in my area that weren't on my list! It didn't take long before I was checking the app every day to see what had been reported near my location. This was before I did any traveling at all!

Now, trips to East Texas and the Lower Rio Grande Valley behind me (4 North America lifers) and the Texas Coastal Prairie ahead of me, I am on the app multiple times each day! The Texas Coastal Prairie trip is a search for specific species for 5 new birders and 5 experienced ones. We have used it to help plan our route for the weekend birding trip and have had a blast doing it. Now I get asked "where is xx bird being seen?" and I have an answer for that!   Thanks for a very useful app!"
-- Laurie F., Austin Texas


"This app has changed the way that I bird now. I love it. It makes me want to get out much more often."
-- Pete M. Virginia, USA


"This could be the best app out there for birds! Great job!"
-- Jay P.


"Awesome!!!! I just got the program and it is as great as I expected.  Beats that "other" bird app by a million miles!!  Thanks Cornell, authors, and all who were involved."
-- Justin H., British Columbia, Canada


"In 2010 I fulfilled a long-time goal of doing a big year in California.   The year ended with 444 species.   BirdsEye was my go-to tool for planning trips to knock out my target species, especially in areas where I don't bird much.  It is also a great tool for quickly seeing what birds are nearby that I need for my year list.  Awesome.  Now that my big year is over, I use BirdsEye daily for keeping track of what other birders are seeing nearby."
-- David B. Pasadena, CA


"I have been using BirdsEye for a year now and I have to say it is a really great app. I use it in conjunction with iBird and between the two, I have all my birding needs met. I usually use the great search function with iBird to try to narrow down what I have just seen or heard. Then I use BirdsEye to see if my choice has been seen in the area recently. I imagine, as I get better identifying birds, I may be able to use the BirdsEye app alone, but at this point, I use it to verify what I think I have seen or heard. What I love about BirdsEye is the social networking aspect of the app. You can see what species other birders have identified in your area. You can create a life list (birds you have identified) and can add your birds to ebird so your sightings will appear on the app. What a great idea for a birding app."
-- Daniel J.


"I've been using BirdsEye for over a month and am amazed at what it can do. It's fun. It helps me find birds. And places to go birding I never would have known about. John James Audubon... you don't know what you missed! Kaufman calls this "the best invention for birding since binoculars." I think he's right. When I put BirdsEye in the hands of a three-year old, she quickly learned how to play the bird songs. She couldn't stop laughing. But most important, it has helped me find more birds. I've used it on business trips to show me where birds are being seen and how I can get there. The observations from eBird (Cornell's Lab of Ornithology) are up-to-date... sometimes within hours of a sighting. The photographs from the Academy of Natural Sciences are inspiring. And the text from top-notch birder Kenn Kaufman help me figure out where to look for each elusive species. I read that the app includes data from b and that the Cornell database gets over one million new observations a month. This must be one of the biggest "citizen science" projects ever! And now it's got an awesome interface with BirdsEye."
-- "Beginning Birder"

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